Book Review – Agent Storm: My Life inside Al-Queda and the CIA

imageAgent Storm: My Life Inside Al Qaeda and the CIA by Morton Storm with Paul Cruickshank & Tim Lister

After seeing Agent Storm being interviewed about his dangerous adventures as a double agent for The Taliban and The CIA , I immediately downloaded his book. As A Danish citizen who spent his youth in a motorcycle gang, going in and out of jail,  he’s an unlikely candidate to become an Islamic follower.  After reading a book about The Prophet Muhammad, Morten Storm is mesmerized by the Islamic religion, prompting his conversion to Islam. He moves to the UK, becomes radicalized and goes to Yemen to study Arabic. There are many twist and turns in his story. He explains the connection between different Islamic networks and their secret communication methods, along with finding a European wife for al-Awlaki. During his Taliban fighting in Afghanistan, he becomes friends with Anwar al-Awlaki, an American born terrorist cleric (and successor to Osama Bin Laden). After several years of fighting for al-Qaeda, Storm realizes the Islamic religion isn’t meeting his spiritual needs and questions the rational behind killing others, in the name of religion.  He returns to Denmark and becomes involved with Danish and British intelligence and The CIA.

Agent Storm provides  a substantial amount of supporting evidence to give credibility to his story. Whether you want to believe Storm’s incredible story or not, he is a terrific storyteller. I read this book in one day. I highly recommend Agent Storm: My Life Inside al-Qaeda and the CIA if you enjoy real life adventure-spy stories.

RATING: 5 STARS

A To Z Challenge: “F” for Thriller Book Review: Consent To Kill

ConsentToKill

Today’s prompt for the A to Z challenge is “F”. I couldn’t find an interesting thriller with a title starting with “F”, so I’m using the author’s last name – Vince Flynn.

“Consent to Kill” by Vince Flynn, follows Mitch Rapp, an elite counterterrorism operative for the CIA. Reading a Flynn novel is like being privy to a secret, namely one that involves the inner workings of the government. Flynn’s extensive research is reflected in his writing with his use of intricate details involving code names and weaponry.
The overall theme is the relationship between duty and love and the fine line that is difficult to measure. Does Rapp have time for love in between hunting terrorists? As Rapp’s hunters descend upon him, the entire political landscape is put on edge. Will the government control their best man, or will circumstances require ruthless intervention and consequences?

Despite the lengthy attention to detail at times, Consent to Kill is an exciting and thrilling read.

Review: 4 STARS