How To Force A Redirect To The Classic WordPress.com Editor Interface

Here’s some useful and easy to follow steps on how to force a redirect to the classic wordpress.com editor.

Diary of Dennis

classic editor wordpress

The Solution To Use The Classic Editor

If you are blogger at wordpress.com, this post here will help you to solve a big problem. As you have noticed, the decision makers at WordPress want to force you to use the recent new editor interface that is purely designed for mobile devices and for users who only create short-form content. This is of course a pain if you are desktop user and if you like to create long-form content as well. In this post you will learn how to get back to the classic editor permanently.

In the new editor form, we had a link back to the classic editor but that link is now gone too. WordPress does not have the intention to give us the link back as you can read here in the forums. If you go through this huge forum thread, you will find out…

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Book Giveaway – Win a copy of The French Executioner

TheFrenchExecutioner

I have one new paperback copy of The French Executioner by C.C. Humphreys to give away.
This thrilling novel captures the breathtaking story of how courage,love and loyalty bound Anne Boleyn to the man who ended her life – and saved her legacy.

Click the link below to enter the giveaway!

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/8b73a5a60/

Book Review: Shirley by Susan S. Merrell

shirleycover
In my last post, I reviewed The Haunting of Hill House (THOHH) by Shirley Jackson. Shirley is  described as a psychological thriller, yet it’s really more of an homage, a fictionalized account of Shirley Jackson and her Professor husband Stanley about their time spent at their home in Vermont. The story has a dreamy, sleepy feel that fluctuates between biography and suspenseful fiction. Rose, a young pregnant wife from a difficult background and her Professor husband drive to Bennington College so he can work and finish his dissertation while living with his mentor Stanley Hyman and his wife Shirley Jackson. Jackson is an established writer and Rose admires her and becomes enmeshed with Jackson’s dynamics of the Hyman’s dysfunctional marriage. As time goes on, the troubled Hyman marriage is filled with secrets and Rose’s life begins to mirror theirs.

I enjoyed how the author explored the themes of jealousy, obsession, scandal and love. Yet certain parts of the book left me frustrated.  Merrell builds up tension throughout the story by creating an impeding sense of doom, yet the suspense doesn’t lead anywhere and the outcome is never revealed. For example, Rose becomes intrigued with the story of a young missing college student, but the outcome isn’t revealed to the reader. The premise of the story is unbelievable. Why would a couple with four children take in two strangers? As for the character development, I felt a palpable connection to Shirley, but didn’t feel an emotional connection to Rose.  Since Rose is a new mother, her constant drowsiness initially makes sense, yet the idea that the house is “alive and speaking” to Rose was  too reminiscent of – you guessed it- THOHH.

Perhaps I’d view the book in a more positive light, if I wasn’t already exposed to Shirley Jackson’s writing. I don’t think  Shirley Jackson would feel happy about the way she’s depicted in this book. Although Shirley has all of the merits of a well written interesting book,  since I’ve already read The House on Haunted Hill, my thoughts of Shirley are already skewed. There are just too many similarities between the books.

RATING: 3.5 stars

** An advanced review copy of Shirley was provided by Netgalley for a fair and honest review.

#Search Engine Optimisation for #Indie Authors: How Far Should You Go?

Some food for though for all of the indie writers out there.
Like Cate, we face the same dilemma between maintaining a balance between optimizing our blogs for search engines and time spent on writing. We need to zero in on the “sweet spot” of our creativity in order to produce the best work possible. This means spending more time on our writing and less time marketing yourself.
What do you think? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

How many words do you write a day? And do you have to force yourself? How successful authors do it

One of my favorite authors, Roz Morris, is featured on “Fresh Pressed. She discusses the sticky subject of daily word counts and how successful authors to meet their deadlines. Check out her blog, which is full of tips for writers. Her “Nail Your Novel” books have helped me through the rough patches of writing.

Nail Your Novel

Dave writing This question appeared in my inbox from Adam Nicholls after I reported on Facebook that I’d managed 4,000 words of The Mountains Novel in one day. Adam DMd me, in not a little anguish:

How many words do you write per day? And do you have to force yourself to do it? I love writing, but it’s work.

There are two significant points in this question:

  • output; books growing steadily at a satisfactory rate
  • difficulty.

How many words per day?

I asked this question of a group I’m a member of, The League of Extraordinary Authors. Romance author Melissa Foster says she has no difficulty getting 7,000 to 10,000 words written in a day and that she adores the blank page. No issues with output there. (But there’s more to writing a good novel than stacking up the wordcount, as she points out in the comments below.)

Romance author

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